The Architecture of Democracy

The Architecture of Democracy: American Architecture and the Legacy of the Revolution

From the Publisher

Centered on his intriguing synthesis of the American republic’s architectural and democratic traditions, Allan Greenberg’s essay moves across geography and through history as the renowned architect and scholar makes the case that America’s architectural tradition and political ideals are deeply connected.  At the core of the American democratic architectural tradition is the modest, single-family house, which gave rise to the statehouse, the courthouse, the firehouse, the schoolhouse, the jailhouse, and the President’s house (as it was known before it became the White House).Generously illustrated and skillfully written, Architecture of Democracy traces a common line from the earliest colonial settlements to the Western frontier of the nineteenth century and today’s ultramodern city centers. The volume will imbue in its readers a newfound appreciation for the democratic ideals that American architecture strives to express and uphold.

Rizzoli International Publications, Press Release

If the building block of American democracy is the citizen, then the citizen’s home can be considered the building block of American architecture. From the family house, to such iconic symbols of statehood as Mt. Vernon and Monticello, the values of democracy are evident through uniquely American design. In Rizzoli’s latest, Architecture of Democracy, top architect Allan Greenberg makes a case for the profound relationship between democracy and this country’s architecture.

Using as a point of departure the intriguing synthesis of America’s architectural and democratic traditions, Greenberg supports his premise as he moves through the nation’s history showing that America’s architectural traditions and political ideals are, in fact, deeply and inextricably connected. In Architecture of Democracy, Greenberg argues that at the core of the American democratic architectural tradition is the modest, single-family house, which gave rise to the statehouse, the courthouse, the firehouse, the schoolhouse, the jailhouse, and the President’s house (as it was known before it became the White House).

Generously illustrated and skillfully written, Architecture of Democracy traces a common line from the earliest colonial settlements, and the Western frontier of the nineteenth century, to today’s ultramodern city centers. The volume will imbue in its readers a newfound appreciation for the democratic ideals that American architecture strives to express and uphold.

New York: Rizzolu, 2006

ISBN: 0847827993

Purchase Here on Amazon.com


2 Responses to “The Architecture of Democracy”

  1. Mr. Greenburg–I read your book two years ago when I was teaching a children’s art class on the architecture of state capitol. It was a fascinating, informative and wonderful read. I’ve recommended it many times since then and am doing a pingback for a blog post today. Thank you for such a wonderful work!

    –Wren

  2. […] about the effect of architecture on the public mind, and vice versa, is Allan Greenberg’s The Architecture of Democracy.  It is a fascinating, engrossing and informative […]

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